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Looking for video content ideas for your business? We’ve got you covered with a whopping
list of 37 video content ideas that you can use to create engaging, and highly sharable
videos.

1. Creat a customer testimonial

Get a quick Zoom testimonial from a client to create your own customer testimonial. A testimonial need not be long, but there should be one clear takeaway from the viewer as to why people should choose your product!

2. Share an announcement

A new product launch? A new location opening? A new offer? Why say it with mere text on your social media channels when you can create a video which will make it more exciting?

3. Make a how-to video

Search for a topic in your industry or category that your customers would like to know more about and create a simple how-to video on it. It will answer a question and provide value.

4. Share behind-the-scenes footage

This kind of insider information will interest audiences. It could be about how you brainstorm ideas or how you prepare for a client presentation or website redesign.

5. Host a Q & A session

Request your followers to ask questions through your social media pages. Then, pick out a few and answer them with the necessary graphics. Remember to thank the individual who asked the question when you answer it. 

6. Talk about an industry trend

Is there something about your industry that you could talk about? Maybe it’s about a new technology or regulation or hiring practices? A video like this will help you become an authority on the subject. 

7. Show the making of your product

Share how you develop it from the design stage to the eventual product. Show all the necessary steps but ensure that it’s a short video. Use fast motion wherever necessary. You can do the same if you offer a service by focusing on the steps you take. 

8. Demonstrate the best way to use your product

Make it easy for your customers by sharing insider secrets on how best to use your product or service. You could even make a listicle out of it. For example, “Top 6 ways to use our product or service.”

9. Explain on a whiteboard

These are the easiest videos to make since all you need is a whiteboard and a tripod. Explain something about your industry or how your audience can benefit from your product or how you develop new services. 

10. Interview someone

It could be a leading figure in your industry, media, or even your mentor. Aside from the fact that the person you interview will also share the video, this is a great tactic to grow your professional network. 

11. Present your employees

Have you recently hired anyone? How about your first employee? Do you have someone with interesting hobbies? Get them on camera and ask them interesting questions, even about working with you. This will make your business relatable. 

12. Share a day-in-the-life video of your business

Show your audiences what it feels like to spend a day in your office or factory. Shoot short clips of the key moments to share how you create a product or service. Don’t make it too polished. Let the camera get a natural view of things. 

13. Unbox a product and review it

You don’t need any special training to unbox a product, share its features, show how it’s used, and review it. This will be of great value to your audiences especially if you manage to do it as soon as the product or service hits the market. 

14. Share your screen and show how you work

A simple and effective way to humanize your business – and yourself – would be to share your screen through Quicktime or a similar tool. You can then tell your viewers how you do things and the challenges you usually face. 

15. Show a time-lapse

If you’re working on a big project or a large product, a time-lapse video is one of the most exciting ways to share its progress with your audience. 

16. Share a story

Is there something interesting about how you got the idea for your product or service? Your first customer? Your biggest challenges? Tell it as a story.

17. Create a trailer for an upcoming event

Have an event or webinar coming up? Record a quick preview of what people should expect.

18. Do a before-after video

Are you redoing your office, working on a project for your client, or revamping your website? A before-after video can make it interesting for your viewers. 

19. Combine your favorite videos

Have a roundup of your most popular videos from the past six months or a year and make a video out of those snippets. This is also an effective way to showcase the projects you would have been working on. 

20. Thank your viewers

Did you recently do a live session? Did you request questions from the audience for a Q & A video? Did your social media page cross a certain follower milestone? Make a video and thank your audience for that. 

21. Show your office

Take viewers on a tour of your office. Introduce colleagues, meeting rooms, and share glimpses of any product or service that you’ve been working on. 

22. Share a teaser

Are you working on a new product? Is there a new guest coming on your podcast? Have you landed a major project for a client? Tease your viewers with the news without revealing much. 

23. Summarize a blog post

Have you recently written an interesting blog post that’s been getting good feedback? Summarize it for your audience with the key points. Use graphics for explanation and share the video on your social media channels. 

24. Answer frequently asked questions

Collect all the questions or feedback that you get through email, social media, or website. Make a video answering those questions and use infographics to explain your answers. 

25. Share what you’ve been up to

This could be a recap of what your business has been doing for the past six months or so. Share news about new products, client acquisitions, projects, or recruitments.

26. Talk to future employees

People would be interested in how to get into your industry. Talk to them and explain the academic requirements or experience. These videos can also become great recruitment tools. 

27. Do a publicity stunt

This will require a lot of creativity and courage but if you can think of the right idea and execute it well, such a video has the potential to go viral. 

28. Comment on a popular topic or news

It could be something related to your industry or consumers as a whole. Explain the issue, how it affects you or your viewers, and then share your views on it. 

29. Talk about the popular myths about your industry

Outsiders may have many myths about your industry. Demystify them through a video and explain the truths. This will give you credibility and set you apart from your competitors.

30. Run an office competition

Think of an imaginative competition you can run among your colleagues and shoot them as they attempt it. This is an excellent tactic to showcase your colleagues and raise their spirits.

31. Share tips with your viewers

It could be related to the usage of your product or service or a topic that’s relevant to your viewers. The good news is that you can also repurpose this in your blog.

32. Conduct a poll

Ask people for their opinion or feedback on a particular topic. You can film it in public locations which will make it look authentic. 

33. Share results of surveys

If you’ve already conducted a survey, share its results through a video. Use infographics to explain them and thank your viewers for participating in the survey.

34. Talk about your challenges

How hard was it when you were starting out? How long did it take to get your first client or customer? Were there serious financial difficulties? Talk about them through a video.

35. Create a cinemagraph

Cinemagraphs are those images that have a single changing element. It’s not hard to learn and you’ll be delighted with the results when you produce one. 

36. Impersonate someone

Videos needn’t be all about work. You can impersonate a colleague, someone from the industry, or a celebrity. It doesn’t have to be perfect. It just has to entertain the viewers. 

37. Be a commentator

It could be a meeting, a conference, or a casual get-together in your office. Approach it like a professional sports commentator and relay the event to your viewers. 

In short

Most of these video content ideas don’t require any expertise or serious budget. Start by doing three-four of them and expand slowly. Over a few weeks, you’ll realize that you’ve got a variety of great video content ideas to share.

Did you know you can turn a Zoom recording into a podcast clip in just minutes? Perhaps you just held a virtual conference or an educational event – think about how convenient it would be if you could repurpose that content into a podcast. At Milk Video we can help you do just that, all you need to do is follow these simple steps!  

1. Upload Zoom to Milk Video

The first thing you need to do to turn your zoom into a podcast is to upload the file to Milk Video

Start by locating the saved file on your desktop or another storage device. Select this file and choose upload to start the conversion process. There is no need to break this file up into multiple clips, as our convenient tools can help you do that in the next step. 

2. Identify the Moment You Want to Turn into a Podcast Clip

Once you have uploaded the zoom content to Milk Video, it is time to choose the moments you want to turn into a podcast clip. There may be parts of the zoom meeting you wish to exclude, like introductions, Q&A sessions, or other portions of the content. With our tools, you can seamlessly identify the most impactful portions of the zoom meeting and convert them into a podcast clip.

Don’t worry about choosing clips that aren’t continuous – we can help you put those together in the next step. All you need to worry about is picking the moments that will help bring your podcast together!

Continue reading “How to Turn a Zoom into a Podcast Clip in Minutes”

Today Milk Video, a web app for turning video recordings into highlights, announced $1.5 million in seed funding from Dharmesh Shah, Co-founder of Hubspot, and Y Combinator. Milk Video will use the funds to grow the engineering and go-to-market teams, build out world-class video design features for its customers, scale enterprise solutions, and develop third party integrations with video tools like Zoom. 

Founded in 2020, by Lenny Bogdonoff and Ross Cranwell, Milk Video helps companies turn their long-form video and audio recordings into digestible marketing and sales highlights used to drive traffic, leads, and sales. The platform makes it accessible for anyone to turn recordings into designed video snippets to be used for social media clips, virtual event recaps, and Zoom meeting summaries.

“The massive spike in webinars, Zooms, and virtual events has meant that hours of raw, unedited video content are sitting in archives completely underutilized.” said CTO and Co-founder Lenny Bogdonoff. “With Milk Video, go-to-market teams who don’t have professional design experience, can now edit, design and share video snippets from these recordings in minutes instead of hours.”

In addition to creating visually engaging clips with quality templates and styled captions, Milk Video also includes video hosting, multi-scene video highlights, custom font support, and many more features to support creators at early-stage companies and enterprises alike.

“I love tools that help you do things that you know you should be doing — but you don’t, because it’s too annoying. Milk Video unlocks the full potential of video for marketers and sales teams by pulling highlights in seconds. Milk Video makes it easy to get more out of the video content you already have. It’s the way this should have worked all along,” said Dharmesh Shah, Co-founder of Hubspot.

“With apps like TikTok, we’ve seen how individuals can quickly edit and design video – but the B2B space falls far behind in this area,” said CEO and Co-founder Ross Cranwell. “60-minute webinars may be the norm now, but short-form, engaging content is the future for marketers to drive awareness and for sales and customer success teams to drive revenue and product adoption.”

In addition to Hubspot Co-founder Dharmesh Shah and Y Combinator, Milk Video funders include Optimizely Co-founders Pete Koomen and Dan Siroker, Wistia CEO and Founder Chris Savage, Danial Gross’s Pioneer, Squad Founder and Product at Twitter, Esther Crawford, Breather Co-founder Julien Smith, Derrick Li, Evan Conrad, Andrew Badr, Ted Benson, Payman Nejati and Sharon Li, Craig Cannon, Jenny 8 Lee, Victoria Ku, Ryan Dawidjan, Benjamin Thompson, Austin Esecson, Jason Barry, Lisha Li through Amplify‘s Explorer fund, Blaine Vess, Roman Rosario, Walter Chen, Kulveer Taggar, Alejandro Leon, Mila Ferrell, Cough Drop Capital, Taurus Ventures, Altair Capital, Amino Capital, First Row Partners and others. 

Photo credit: Marco Giannavola.

We’ve heard from our users that design is of massive importance when putting out video content — so we’ve made it that one bit easier to put out great looking content.

Introducing Video Templates.

On Milk Video, you can now clip a video and go through 4 steps to turn it into a video like you see below.

Get started with your first clip – or read on.

How Video Templates Work

Step 1: Upload video to process transcription

Step 2: Clip your video

Step 3: Choose a template

Step 3: Edit your headline

Step 4: Add a logo

Step 5: Download and share

So now, once you finish your webinar or Zoom call, just upload it to Milk and have a designed clip to share with your team or your prospects in minutes.

With everyone working at lightning pace and moving from one project to the next, it’s crucial to turn content around quickly — and Milk Video helps you do that.

Give it a try now..

Today the Milk Video team got together to discuss how to create customer testimonials, as well as to show off some product updates. Here are the highlights:

Why create customer testimonials?

So why are customer testimonials so important in the first place? How can you use them to promote your business or product? Ross shares some of his thoughts on the subject

Gathering testimonials strategy #1: Zoom

So how do you get new video testimonials from your clients and partners? Ross discusses how to solicit quick and easy feedback from a tool we’ve all come to know and love – Zoom!

Gathering testimonials strategy #2: Archive digging

It can take time to collect customer testimonials from your customers. But wait, don’t you already have a bunch of recordings in your archives where your customers are singing your praises? Ross discusses how you can reuse those recordings

Creating a customer testimonial from a zoom call in Milk Video

Here Ross walks us through a quick example of creating a customer testimonial video from a zoom recording.

Creating a customer testimonial from archived recordings in Milk Video

Next Ross walks us through creating a customer testimonial from an archived recording

Pre built video templates!

Lenny shares a great upcoming feature – pre-built templates! Keep your eyes out for these in the next week!

Full video

Want to watch the full thing? Here you go!

Customer testimonials are one of the most authentic and engaging types of marketing. Keep reading to learn more about what they are, how to design them with Milk Video, and the best places to share your finished product!

What is a Testimonial?

A testimonial is a quote from a client – in written or video form – that expresses their satisfaction with your brand, products, and services. These positive reviews include information that explains why the customer was happy with their experience, so other potential buyers know what to expect.

Testimonials can cover everything from the buying process to the products themselves. The idea is that these positive quotes will encourage customers that are on the fence about your brand to make a purchase. They can go a long way in building trust and credibility!

Preparing your Testimonial

To see the best results, you need to create authentic and engaging content. Here are the answers to the most common questions about how to prepare your testimonials:

Continue reading “How to create a testimonial”

Does your brand need a highlight video to showcase your products and engage with your customers? If so, then you need to know how to create a video highlight reel! At Milk Video, we have you covered – our tools can help you easily build the content you need so you can focus on running your business.

What are Video Highlight Reels

Video highlight reels are a type of content that strings together clips from other media. Each video clip is organized to make the final product look seamless, even though they were pulled from different content.

Highlight reels typically include an overlay of music to tie the finished video together and express the message your brand is trying to get across.

What Can They Be Used For?

You may be wondering, what can you use a highlight reel for?

Continue reading “How to Create a Video Highlight Reel”

Highlight reels are a great way to showcase your brand, summarize a webinar, or create a short marketing clip that will grab your viewers’ attention. While it may seem time-consuming to string together these highlights piece by piece, there is an easier way: Milk Video. 

This guide will review everything you need to know about video highlight reels, including how you can use Milk Video to create them within minutes!

Video Highlight Reels: The Basics

A video highlight reel maker is a tool that simplifies the process of developing the desired content. It allows you to break up a longer video – and images – and string the pieces together to create an effective summary of the original content.

It is a great way to promote your brand and engage with your audience without making them commit to a longer video! Most highlight reels are organized to look seamless, and companies tend to overlay them with a sound that ties everything together. 

What Tool Can I Use to Make One?

Rather than spending hours trimming and editing clips to create your video highlight reel, the best option is to use Milk Video

Our platform can help you prepare video highlights in minutes, without any of the tedious and time-consuming work that would normally be required. Here’s all you need to do:

  1. Upload your video to the platform
  2. Use our convenient tools to clip the best moments from the recording
  3. Organize and design the clips to present your material in the most effective way for your brand

As you can see, Milk Video makes it easy to create a library of video highlights so that you can enhance your marketing campaigns and build content that best matches your brand. 

Today was the Milk Video team’s first product presentation through live stream! We reviewed the Product Hunt announcement for Highlight Reels and went through core features related to our customers.

Please see the video clips below for some of the important parts.

Milk Video Team Stream intro

Ross Cranwell explains the Milk Video Team Stream’s content.

Highlight Reel run-through

Jacques Blom does a end-to-end run-through of the new Highlight Reel workflow.

New Share functionality

Lenny Bogdonoff explains the new “Share” functionality for uploads, clips and designed video downloads.

Using custom fonts

Jacques shares how users can now upload custom fonts and use them for word-by-word captions in their videos.

Saving time editing and sharing

Ross and Lenny explain the customer experience of saving time. Koby Conrad from Rupa Health said “this used to take me 8 hours”.

Customer spotlight: Go1

Ilce Perez talks about Sales personalization with Ross. Go1, a company learning management system, empowers growth and sales representatives to produce their own video content. By personalizing outreach and using a designed visual layout, teams are able to produce more video quickly.

Visiting speaker

Jeff Tang from Athens Research talks about the tools they use for running a remote engineering team.

If you’ve watched videos online, you’ve likely come across subtitles and close captioning. Did you know that these two terms do not mean the same thing? While many people use them interchangeably, subtitles and captions describe two different things. This guide will explore the meaning of each term and explain how they are different.

What is Closed Captioning?

The term caption refers to the text on a video that describes the dialogue and other relevant sounds played. The word caption is rather broad, and we can break that down into two options: closed captions and open captions.

Closed captions are produced by the application or platform that displays the video. As a result, the viewer can easily press a button to turn them off. If you watch Netflix, you will notice that you can toggle closed captions on and off as needed to suit your viewing needs.

Open captions, on the other hand, are embedded in the actual video file. This means that the user can’t turn them off because they are linked to the other images and audio playing on your screen.

So, what is closed captioning used for?

The most common use of captions is to make video content accessible to those who are hard of hearing. The text will describe everything happening in the video, including non-speech elements like background noises and sound effects. They will also identify speakers so that viewers can note what is happening in the video with ease.

U.S. laws require captions for most video content, so you will see these displayed on all major platforms and video-sharing sites. Their purpose is to aid viewers, so you can also change the positioning on the screen to avoid obstructing essential visual elements in the video.

How Are Subtitles Different?

You may be thinking that captions seem like they are the same thing as subtitles. They both represent text that moves across your screen as the video plays, and most of the time they describe what the characters on your screen are saying. So, what makes them different?

The key here is that subtitles help those viewers who don’t speak the language shown in the video. In other words, subtitles work to translate spoken dialogue into another language – their primary purpose is not to help those who are hard of hearing understand the video.

If you speak the language that the video is in then the terms might seem very similar, but the differences become clear when you read the text in another language.

Although the words synchronize to the audio that is playing, the subtitles do not include non-speech elements. The assumption here is that the viewer can read the subtitles in their native language but still listen to background noises and sound effects with their natural hearing.

Users can generally toggle subtitles on and off, and many large platforms allow you to choose subtitles in a broad range of languages.